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Why Seasick Sunscreen?

The ocean produces 80% of the world's oxygen and is home to millions of animal species from tiny plankton, to colourful coral, to the immense blue whale. So why Seasick Sunscreen?

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Healthy for our ocean
A healthy ocean is at the heart of what Seasick stands for.  The majority of sunscreens on the market are filled with nasty chemicals that harm our sea life. These sunscreens are so harmful in fact, that they are increasingly being banned by reef-rich dive destinations such as Hawaii, Palau and the Great Barrier Reef. Seasick contains only four ingredients, all of which are natural and none of which harm our ocean. Our packaging is plastic free and recyclable (or we can refill your empty pots). At Seasick we care about battling climate change, and our product does too. 
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Healthy for you
Chemical sunscreens are absorbed straight into your bloodstream. Oxybenzone, one of the most common ultraviolet-blocking chemicals in sunscreen for example, can be detected in urine within 30 minutes of application. Because Seasick is made with non-nano zinc oxide rather than being chemical based, it sits on top of your skin providing it with protection against UVA/UVB rays and moisture, without any nasty extras. Being chemical free doesn't mean we compromise on sun safety. The sun in New Zealand is so strong that we have some of the highest rates of melanoma in the world. Seasick has been developed by a fair skinned, redheaded Kiwi who lives outdoors and takes sun safety seriously!
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Sources:
Downs CA, Kramarsky-Winter E, Segal R, et al. Toxicopathological Effects of the Sunscreen UV Filter,Oxybenzone (Benzophenone-3), on Coral Planulae and Cultured Primary Cells and Its Environmental Contamination in Hawaii and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Arch Environ Contam Toxicol 2015 Oct 20. doi: 10.1007/s00244-015-0227-7.
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E. Johnsen, Toxicological Effects of Commercial Sunscreens on Coral Reef Ecosystems: New Protocols for Coral Restoration. NSUWorks (2020), (available at https://nsuworks.nova.edu/cnso_stucap/335/).
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J. Hiller et al., Environment International, in press, doi:10.1016/j.envint.2019.105068.